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, present-day india, the ching dynasty, temporary china, and the tokugawa shogunate in japan. each of these fears had its own way of governing on its own cultural and political approach to commerce, and order. if you fast-forward about 100, 120 years to the 19th century, the world changed dramatically. power had shifted from the west and the south to the north. and by 1815, the end of the napoleonic wars, europe had pulled ahead of the rest of the world. and the industrial revolution and the development of the steam engine and the development of steel and battleships, and the telegraph and underground, the underwater submarine cable enabled europe, not just to be the most powerful place in the world, but to extend its reach globally. and by the end of the 19th century, europe had either colonized or had already de- colonized 90% of the world landmass. and we have been living in the world since 1815 dominated by the west. economically, politically and ideologically. first it was europe, then europe handed over the baton to the united states after pearl harbor, and roughly 1815 until
online. today the u.s. economy accounts for 23% of the world's economy and india is 7. in 2030, according to the oecd predictions, china will be 29% of the world economy, the u.s. will be 18 and india will be 11. and those are, i think, really worthwhile numbers to keep in our mind as we talk about u.s. competitiveness in the world economy, because we're entering this entirely new era where the u.s. is going to be a big player in the world economy but no longer the preeminent, the very largest one, and i think that brings real challenges and requires a whole new way of thinking. so my opening remarks, steve was introduced, i think quite rightly, as a guy who i hope is getting cases of champagne and bouquets of flowers from the white house. because on certain readings you could say, you know, he's the guy who got the president reelected. that means, i believe, he has great insight into what obama's second term economic policy will be -- [laughter] and the big question on the agenda which i think certainly already tremendous bearing on u.s., on the u.s. domestic economy and, therefore, u.s.
immigrants will be from mexico, india, and china, again if this bill passes a higher percentage of our immigrants will be from the major countries that send people here. . that's not the end of the world but there's added value in having people from all corns of the worldcom here and be part of our great country. in many cases this is the only way people from nepal or albania or ethiopia have a shot at coming to this country and succeeding. we also need people in this country across all different skill levels in our labor market. whether that labor includes toiling in the field or toiling in the downtown buildings at night or programming computers or designing aircraft, we have needs across all sectors of our economy. not -- yes, in stem, but not just in stem. so we are asked to choose. asked to choose between people with graduate degree who we want to keep here in science, technology, engineering, and math. in many cases, if they're not allowed to stay, they will have to return to other countries and the jobs will follow them, costing our country jobs. choose between them and allowing
that need to be stepping up to the plate and taking on more of your responsibilities. indonesia, india, brazil, turkey, south africa, but at the same time, we also hear the statements made that as they get involved and should step up to the plate in helping to nurture democracy come to protest human rights, but that they also have to make sure there roadhouses in order. what are your thoughts on that? >> certainly, more nations now have their role to play. definitely, in our case, we're trying to play a role based on our experience. as you might know, our country just 10, 20 years ago was always mentioned with drug trafficking and corruption and. that was the case. a more important message to leave before this panel is democracy is very important. it is important when the people really want to see their relations. with what happened in colombia, in our case, very strong, important leadership for municipal leaders and, at the same time, and national will to find a role has been critical. after that, then you find international support and cooperation. in the case of colombia, it is an i
six new cardinals telling them to be more like jesus. they're from across the globe, the u.s., india, nigeria, yom i colombia and the philippines. >> we've heard of people converting from different religious but more are going back to thes religious they grew up with. >> hay there. this is a growing social trend. increasing numbers of u.s. adults are returning to the religion under which they were raised. over 90% have gone back to the religion of their childhood. we discovered the structure and values they were raised with. challenging events like hurricane sandy and the tough economy are among the prime reasons. >> for me personally, it was when things looked down, i look up. i think in my experience here, we see a lot of that, where people hit a low and need somewhere to turn and look and they look up and look for god or some kind of faith. >> what is really interesting about rebirths is they appear to be genuinely returning for spiritualty not just support. it's more about reconnecting with their original belief system, shannon. >> they may begin to come back for no, nostalgic re
. the diverse group comes from across the globe colombia, india, nigeria, the philippines and of course, the u.s. there is is sadness we have been talking about over the loss of dallas' star larry hagman. >> j.r. >> wait a minute. >> this is your style j.r. my wife and the man who put cliff barnes in office. >> you have got in plenty of trouble before y'all got married. i don't understand why you think she would change. >> hey, wait a. >> oh, knock it off. >> hagman, of course, best known for his role as the villain j.r. ewing on dallas. he lost his battle with cancer yesterday at a dallas hospital. his co-star on the show linda gray had this to say. larry hagman was my best friend for 35 years. pied piper of life. brought joy to everyone he knew. i will miss him enormously. he was the sob of broadway star mary martin and also known for his role in major tony nelson in "i dream of jean j" he was 81 years old. >> hagman was not just famous here but a legend over in europe when he went to germany he was a rock star, ireland, england, paris. they really loved his character j.r. from dallas. iconi
and germany and india and if we're going to have an american century we cannot come in second place to those countries in technology of the future. and i think that played an important role. there was a sense that the obama vision was one that they thought better suited this moment in our country's history. and there is no question on social issues whether it's women's healthcare or immigration. there was asset of issues that for younger voters was important to think about the kind of country and kind of president they wanted representing them. so on all those questions people wrestled carefully. i think that's why ultimately enough people in enough battleground states chose the president to continue this journey we're on. quickly in terms of demoggrafi. we don't know this for sure but we could be seeing different elections in on years and off years. the election in 2014 is going to be different than presidential lecktorts. and the comments i made were predicated on what we thought would happen in a presidential election. you had latinos turning out. the president won the cuban vote. the fir
with some optimism but a relatively close election. but one thing to note is all the votes are not india, and i think by the time we report all vote in california, the west coast states that do a lot of absentee voting, the president's marginal grow a bit and i think we'll end up with a margin between obama and romney about 3.5%. so still close but not racist impose a not as close as we might've been talking about for a good deal of the election. i think of something right about all the model going on. i know a lot of people talked about that. i want to give a little shout out to many political scientist. i'm a political scientist. sometimes i'm critical of some of their models, but political models try to predict what happens in elections and they usually have some very simple components. how the president is doing. the growth in the economy. not the state of the economy. not the number of unemployment at how we've been improving over the are, and incumbents usually accounts or something. if you look at this election you can say a little bit of growth matters. a president who was sort o
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8